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 Post subject: Remington 6.8 SPC Guide.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:20 pm 
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INTRO:
I've been shooting the Remington 6.8 SPC for approximately 4 years now. I've had 7 different uppers from which I have tested pretty much every bullet/powder combination available. I have put this thread together to help and better inform current users and potential buyers understand what the 6.8 SPC is and what it isn't.

STRENGTHS:
1. 0-600 yard Combat Cartridge.
2. 0-300 yard Hunting Cartridge for small to medium animals.
3. Ideal LE/SWAT/HD Cartridge.

WEAKNESSES:
1. Not a long range cartridge. This is mainly due to the lack of high BC bullets.
2. Still no affordable Plinking Ammo available. Not a cartridge that I would take to a high round count class, unless you can use handloads.

BARREL LENGTHS:
The most popular barrel length is the 16" barrel. The 6.8 SPC is a very efficient cartridge as it uses the medium fast powders from H4198 to H335. When going from a 16"-20" barrel, you will generally see 75-125 FPS increase. Since the 6.8 SPC is such an efficient cartridge, the 18" barrel is the longest I would recommend. Here are the best Barrel Length/Gas Port Locations:

14.5"-below: Carbine Length Gas System.
16": Mid-Length preferred. Carbine Length Gas System, if properly gassed is OK.
18": Mid-Length pretty much a must.
20": Mid-Length and Intermediate Length preferred. Rifle Length will work with the slower powders, but may short stroke with the ever-growing light powders/fast powder combinations.

TWIST RATE:
Twist Rate has very little effect on pressure when compared to the Chamber and the Land to Groove Ratio.

CHAMBERS:
The 6.8 SPC was designed as a Combat Cartridge. One of the most important things about the AR is reliability, especially if you plan to use the 6.8 SPC for serious work. The SPCII and 6.8x43 Chambers are reliable and very accurate. The SPCII and 6.8x43 Chambers have a longer throat which allows you to shoot the hotter loads without worrying too much about pressure signs. For anyone that has a SAAMI Chamber, the one thing you could do is have someone lengthen the throat to the Improved Chamber specs.

Remington 6.8x43 SPC-(SAAMI Chamber):
Has a .050 freebore, 45 degree cone angle, .278 diameter freebore.

6.8 Remington SPCII (SPCII Chamber):
Has a .100 freebore, 45 degree cone angle, .278 diameter freebore, .3085 neck.

6.8x43:
Has a .095 freebore, 45 degree cone angle, .2775 dia, and a .3085/.309 neck.

BARREL GROOVES:
This, along with the proper chamber, is one of the most important ways of reducing the pressure. The best are the 5R, 3-Groove, and Polygonal barrels followed by the 4-Groove. The 6-Groove is OK.

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COMMON SPECS:
1:10"/6-Groove/SAAMI Chamber:
The original specs.
1:10"/6-Groove/SPCII Chamber:
This combination allows for approximately 75 FPS over the 1:10"/6-Groove/SAAMI Chambered Barrels.
1:11"/4-Groove/SPCII Chamber:
This combination allows for approximately 25 FPS over the 1:10"/6-Groove/SPCII Chambered Barrels.
1:12"/3-Groove/6.8x43 Chamber or 1:11.25"/5R/6.8x43 Chamber:
This combination allows for approximately 25 FPS over the 1:11"/4-Groove/SPCII Chambered Barrels.

EXAMPLES OF MAXIMUM LOADS FROM SSA USING THE BARNES 85 GR TSX:
1:10"/6-Groove/SAAMI Chamber: 2950 FPS.
1:11"/4-Groove/SPCII Chamber: 3003 FPS.
1:12"/3-Groove/6.8x43 Chamber or 1:11.25"/5R/6.8x43 Chamber: 3050 FPS.

MAGAZINES:
The 6.8 SPC uses its own dedicated magazines. You can load 5-8 6.8 SPC rounds in a 556 magazine, but after that, the magazine will begin to bulge. The three main 6.8 SPC magazine manufacturers are Barrett, C-Products, and PRI. All three are different in price and allow for different COAL.

Barrett Magazines:
$40-$50. Available in 30 round magazines only. They are approximately 1" longer than standard USGI 556 Magazines. The max you can load your ammo in the Barrett magazines is approximately 2.260", which is shorter than the C-Products and PRI. Best used in Tactical applications due to the length of the magazines.

C-Products:
$12-$15. Available in 5, 10, 17, and 25 round magazines. The 5, 10, and 17 rounders have straight bodies, while the 25 round magazines are curved. These are very reliable and affordable except for the 17 round mags, which are very problematic. The C-Products CS Springs can be a little weak, so it is recommended that they are replaced with the ISMI or Superior Shooting 556 30 round magazine springs for the best reliability. The max you can load your ammo in the C-Products magazines is approximately 2.285". With the ISMI or Superior Shooting Magazine Springs, they are the best bang for the buck of the 3.

PRI (Precision Reflex, inc):
$30-$40. Available in 5, 10, 15, and 25 round curved magazines. The 25 round magazines are similar in length to the 556 30 round magazines. The max you can load your ammo in the PRI magazines is approximately 2.305". The PRI magazines are very popular with the 6.8 SPC Precision shooters who like to load their rounds longer, for increased precision.

MUZZLE THREADS:
The most common muzzle thread for the 6.8 SPC is the 5/8x24, so any .308 muzzle device with the 5/8x24 threads can be used. Stag uses the 1/2x36 muzzle threads, which is the 9mm muzzle thread.

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 Post subject: 6.8 SPC Chart.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:23 pm 
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Click below for a better picture.
http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=tOtyqlb35yLitvWlWWajZyg&output=html

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 Post subject: 6.8 SPC Ballistics and Bullet Info.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:25 pm 
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Click below for a better picture.
http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=tv8ouMbmB88cIgyT0j5E5uw&output=html

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 Post subject: Reloading for the 6.8 SPC
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:30 pm 
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INTRO:
I put this thread together to help out with reloading for the 6.8 SPC. Hopefully this will answer some of the most common asked questions.
Note: Even though this will be geared for the 6.8 SPC, most of this info can also be used for other calibers.

BRASS:
There are three manufacturers of 6.8 SPC Brass. SSA, Hornady, and Remington. SSA and Hornady use the Small Rifle Primers Pockets, while Remington uses the Large Rifle Primers Pockets.
NOTE: SSA has recently made batches of SSA Brass with Large Rifle Primer Pockets.

SSA:
The SSA brass generally lasts 10-15 reloads and holds the most powder.

Hornady:
The Hornady brass is very similar to the SSA brass, but generally holds 1 less GR.

Remington:
The Remington bras is generally a little softer than the SSA brass, so they don't last as long, but you should still be able to get at least 5-8 reloads.

PRIMERS:
There are 4 basic types of primers: Regular, Magnum, Benchrest, and Military.

Standard Primers:
These are the standard primers. Generally, they are great for plinking. They will produce decent velocities and good accuracy. When the primer pockets start to loosen up, the standard primers are real loose and may pop out, especially when you have a hot load.

Magnum Primers:
Magnum primers will produce more velocity, but they also produce more pressure and a higher SD. They are good for bulky powders. Generally, magnum primers can produce as much as 40 FPS more over the Standard Primers, which is equivalent to 1/2 GR powder.

Benchrest Primers:
Known for their consistency. Great for accuracy, but they are generally more expensive.

Military Primers (CCI #41 and CCI #34):
Similar to the Magnum primers in that they are Magnum Primers, but they have thicker cups and they are a little thicker, which is great for when the primer pockets start loosening up.

CCI
Small rifle = 400
Small rifle magnum = 450
Small rifle match = BR4
Small rifle Military = 41
Large rifle = 200
Large rifle magnum = 250
Large rifle match = BR2
Large rifle Military = 34

Federal
Small rifle = 205
Small rifle match = 205M
Large rifle = 210
Large rifle match = 210M
Large rifle magnum = 215
Large rifle magnum match = 215M

Remington
Small rifle = 6 1/2
Small rifle bench = 7 1/2
Large rifle = 9 1/2
Large rifle magnum = 9 1/2M

Winchester
Small rifle = WSR
Large rifle = WLR
Large rifle magnum = WLRM

Wolf
Small rifle = QQQSR
Small rifle = QQSR223
Small rifle magnum = QQQSRM
Large rifle = QQQLR
Large rifle magnum = QQQLRM

RELOADING DIES:
There are several different dies available from Hornady, RCBS, Lyman, and Redding.

Re-Sizing Dies:
One of the biggest questions going around is whether to get the Regular Full-length Sizing Dies or the Small Base Sizing Dies. For auto loaders, such as the AR-15, the Small base dies were designed for reliability in auto loaders. Although many people have used the regular full-length sizing dies for years with no issues, the small base dies are just an extra security.

Seating Dies:
The RCBS dies and the Hornady Seating dies are both very affordable dies that work very well. The Hornady has a sleeve that assists with aligning the bullet. With the Hornady Seating Die, you can also later get the Micro Seating Adapter, which makes it easy to adjust.

Crimp Dies:
Although, crimping the bullets is not necessary, it is highly recommended to crimp the bullets, to prevent bullet set-back. A very affordable crimp die for the 6.8 SPC is the LEE FCD. It is easy to set up and works with or without cannelures on the bullets. In testing that I conducted, the LEE FCD produced a slight (10 FPS) increase and a slight increase in accuracy.

CANNELURE TOOL:
Another highly recommended tool is a Cannelure Tool. Although you can crimp a non-cannelured bullet using the Lee FCD, placing a light cannelure on the bullet will give it the extra grip for the Lee FCD, without sacrificing too much accuracy. If the bullets don't come with cannelures, you can roll your own.
An example of a cannelure tool is the Corbin Cannelure Tool.

HEADSPACE GAUGE TOOLS:
For anyone that reloads, the Hornady Headspace Gauge Kit and the Wilson Case Gauge are two highly recommended tools. They both do the same thing, but they are slightly different. These tools measure the amount that the shoulder is bumped back, which is very important because if the shoulder is not bumped back far enough when re-sizing, you will get brass stuck in your chamber. If the shoulder is bumped back too far, you will have excess headspace and your brass life will decrease.

Wilson Case Gauge:
Very basic tool that allows you to check to see if the brass was re-sized properly. The Wilson Case Gauge is caliber specific, so you have to get one for each caliber.

Hornady Headspace Gauge Kit:
The Hornady Headspace Gauge Kit is a little more complicated to use, but with the supplied bushings, you can use it with pretty much any caliber. (The 6.8 SPC uses the "B" Bushing.).

How to use the Hornady Headspace Gauge:
As already mentioned before, the Hornady Headspace Gauge measure how much you have bumped the shoulder back when you re-size your brass. Along with the tool, you will also need a set of calibers. The tool actually attaches to the calibers. Here are the steps:

1. Measure several fired pieces of FIRED brass and record the readings, but use the lowest reading. Generally, the reading is going to be around 3.355"-3.360". (The factory brass is generally 3.350").
2. Lube your brass, re-size your brass, and measure it using the Hornady Headspace Gauge. Ideally, you want to bump the shoulder back .004". Let's say your fired brass is generally 3.355". When you re-size them, you want to bump the shoulder back to at least 3.351".

If you have more than one 6.8 SPC AR, unless you want to keep the brass separate, which is a pain in the ass and not worth it, I would measure a couple of pieces of fired brass from each barrel and take the lowest reading and bump the shoulder back .004" to ensure reliability in all of the barrels.

NOTE: For other calibers, such as the 5.56, I like to bump the shoulder back to the original brass specs to ensure that the ammo feeds reliably in all ARs. I've been to the range with my 5.56 and I tried shooting my ammo in another AR and it had issues because the ammo was set up for my AR. Now, I just re-size the brass back to the factory brass specs. Just something to consider.

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 Post subject: Bullets for the 6.8 SPC.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:42 pm 
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INTRO:
I have put together this thread as an informative thread for the new guys or anyone else who needs help with selecting the correct .277 bullets for reloading for the Remington 6.8 SPC.

Before I begin, I just want to touch up on the Remington 6.8 SPC. If you are using the 6.8 SPC in an AR-15, there is an OAL that you have to keep in mind. With the Barrett magazines, I would not load the ammo longer than 2.250". With the C-Products, I would not load the ammo longer than 2.280". If you have PRI magazines, I would not load the ammo longer than 2.295". Also, due to the limited powder capacity, it is best to load bullets in the range of 90-135 Gr.

POWDERS:
After doing a lot of testing, I have separated the bullets into the following categories: 90 Gr. bullets, 100-115 Gr. bullets, 120-135 Gr. bullets, 90-115 Gr. bullets, and 90-135 Gr. bullets.

Best Powders for 90 Gr. Bullets:
If you plan on just using the 90 Gr. bullets, I would use the following powders:
1. Reloaders 7. (Extruded)
2. H4198. (Extruded)
3. X-Terminator. (Ball)
4. AA2200. (Ball)

Best Powders for 100-115 Gr. Bullets:
If you plan on just using the 100-115 Gr. bullets, I would use the following powders:
1. H322. (Extruded)
2. Benchmark. (Extruded)
3. Reloaders 10x. (Extruded)
4. 2015. (Extruded)
5. X-Terminator. (Ball)
6. AA2230. (Ball)
7. AA2200. (Ball)
8. TAC. (Ball)
8. H335. (Ball)
10. N133. (Ball)

Best Powders for 120-135 Gr. Bullets:
If you plan on just using the 120-135 Gr. bullets, I would use the following powders:
1. H322. (Extruded)
2. Benchmark. (Extruded)
3. Reloaders 10x. (Extruded)
4. 2015. (Extruded)
5. X-Terminator. (Ball)
6. AA2230. (Ball)
7. AA2200. (Ball)
8. TAC. (Ball)
8. H335. (Ball)
10. N133. (Ball)

Best Powders for 90-115 Gr. Bullets:
If you plan on just using the 90-115 Gr. bullets, I would use the following powders:
1. H322. (Extruded)
2. Reloaders 10x. (Extruded)
3. 2015. (Extruded)
4. X-Terminator. (Ball)
5. AA2230. (Ball)
6. AA2200. (Ball)
7. TAC. (Ball)
8. H335. (Ball)

Best Powders for 90-135 Gr. Bullets:
If you plan on using various bullets in the 90-135 Gr. range, I would use the following powders:
1. H322. (Extruded)
2. Reloaders 10x. (Extruded)
3. 2015. (Extruded)
4. X-Terminator. (Ball)
5. AA2230. (Ball)
6. AA2200. (Ball)
7. TAC. (Ball)
8. H335. (Ball)

BULLET TYPES:
1. FMJ-Full Metal Jacket (Ball Ammo). Unknown at what velocity the Remington FMJ fragments, but the SSA Extreme FMJ is supposed to fragments at 2100+ fps.
2. OTM-Open Tip Match.
HP-Hollow Point.
SMK-Sierra Match King. Generally fragments at 1900+ fps.
3. SP-Soft Point. Generally expands at 1900+ fps.
4. BT-Ballistic Tip. Generally expands or fragments at 1900+ fps.

NOTE: You may see the letter "BT" (Boat-Tail) in front or after the above ammo types. BT stands for "Boat Tail" and refers to the base of the bullet. A "Boat Tail" is a sloping end which narrows gently at the base of the bullet, so that the cross-section resembles the shape of a boat's hull. The boat tail shape reduces drag on a bullet, helping it to retain velocity and resist deflection from crosswinds, but causes the bullet to take longer to "settle" after leaving the barrel compared to a standard "flat-base" bullet. Boat tail bullets are usually selected for long-range shooting, while the flat-base bullet shape tends to be more accurate at short ranges. A "HPBT" bullet is a "Hollow Point Boat Tail" bullet.

The last thing I would like to explain is a Cannelure. A Cannelure is a cut or pressed groove (or grooves) around the shank of a bullet. Cannelures provide an area into which the case mouth may be securely crimped. Military ammo has cannelures to prevent bullet set-back. Bullets with cannelures are not generally used in match ammo because cannelures may decrease the accuracy of the bullet. For Military/LE purposes, bullets with cannelures are preferred. For sniper type applications, bullets without cannelures are usually used.

HOME PROTECTION/SHTF:
Penetration and Fragmentation are key for Home Protection/LE applications. 10-12" is ideal to ensure that it will reach the vital organs.

1. Barnes:
a. 85 Gr. RRLP.

2. Hornady:
a. 100 Gr. SP.
b. 110 Gr. BTHP.
c. 110 Gr. HP.
d. 110 Gr. V-Max.

3. Nosler:
a. 85 Gr. E-Tip.
b. 115 Gr. BTHP.

4. Remington:
a. 100 Gr. SP.
b. 115 Gr. FMJ.

5. Sierra:
a. 90 Gr. HP.
b. 110 Gr. SPT.
c. 115 Gr. SMK.

6. Speer:
a. 90 Gr. TNT.
b. 100 Gr. HP.

BARRIER PENETRATION BULLETS:

1. Barnes:
a. 85 Gr. TSX.
b. 95 Gr. TTSX.
c. 110 Gr. Barnes TSX.
d. 110 Gr. Barnes TTSX.

2. Hornady:
a. 100 Gr. SP.
b. 110 Gr. BTHP.
c. 110 Gr. HP.
d. 120 Gr. SST.

3. Nosler:
a. Accubond 100 Gr. Spitzer.
b. Accubond 110 Gr. Spitzer.
c. Accubond 130 Gr. Spitzer.
d. Ballistic Tip 130 Gr. Spitzer.

4. Remington:
a. 115 Gr. Core Lokt PSP.
b. 130 Gr. Core Lokt PSP.

5. Sierra:
a. 110 Gr. SPT.
b. 130 Gr. SPT.
c. 130 Gr. SBT.

6. Speer:
a. 130 Gr. SP.
b. 130 Gr. BTSP.

HUNTING BULLETS:
For hunting bullets that expand/mushroom are preferred because they don't damage too much meat like the fragmenting bullets.

1. Barnes:
a. 85 Gr. TSX.
b. 95 Gr. TTSX.
c. 110 Gr. Barnes TSX.
d. 110 Gr. Barnes TTSX.

2. Hornady:
a. 100 Gr. SP.
b. 110 Gr. HP.
c. 110 Gr. BTHP.
d. 110 Gr. V-Max.
e. 120 Gr. SST.

3. Nosler:
a. Accubond 100 Gr. Spitzer.
b. Accubond 110 Gr. Spitzer.
c. Accubond 130 Gr. Spitzer.
d. Ballistic Tip 130 Gr. Spitzer.

4. Remington:
a. 100 Gr. PSP.
b. 115 Gr. Core Lokt PSP.
c. 130 Gr. Core Lokt PSP.

5. Sierra:
a. 90 Gr. HP.
b. 110 Gr. SPT.
c. 130 Gr. SPT.
d. 130 Gr. SBT.

6. Speer:
a. 100 Gr. SP.
b. 100 Gr. HP.
c. 130 Gr. SP.
d. 130 Gr. BTSP.

MATCH/COMPETITION/SNIPER BULLETS:

1. Barnes:
a. 85 Gr. RRLP.

2. Elite:
a. 77 Gr. Trident XBT.

3. Hornady:
a. 110 Gr. BTHP
b. 110 Gr. HP.
c. 110 Gr. V-Max.

4. Nosler:
a. 115 Gr. BTHP.

5. Sierra:
a. 90 Gr. HP.
b. 115 Gr. SMK.

6. Speer:
a. 90 Gr. TNT.
b. 100 Gr. HP.

Note: Cannelures are generally not used because of possible accuracy loss.

VARMINT HUNTING:
Varmint Hunters want a bullet that offers great accuracy and rapid expansion. Some of the best bullets for Varmint hunting are the lighter 90-100 Gr. Bullets.

1. Barnes:
a. 85 Gr. RRLP.

2. Hornady:
a. 110 Gr. V-Max.

3. Nosler:
a. 85 Gr. E-Tip.

2. Sierra:
a. 90 Gr. HP.

3. Speer:
a. 90 Gr. TNT.
b. 100 Gr. HP.

PLINKING BULLETS:

1. Remington:
a. 100 Gr. PSP.
b. 115 Gr. FMJ.
c. 130 Gr. Core-Lokt PSP.

2. Speer:
a. 90 Gr. TNT Value Packs.

NOTE: I only listed bullets that could be loaded to magazine length in an AR15.

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 Post subject: Magazines for the 6.8 SPC.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:46 pm 
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INTRO:
Here is a review of the various 6.8SPC magazines that are currently available. This is based on the newer versions and not the old versions.

1. Barrett:
A. Positives:
1. 30 round magazines that load smoothly. Only company that makes 30 rounders at the moment.
2. Metal anti-tilt followers.

B. Negatives:
1. Reliability is hit or miss.
2. Expensive. ($40-50).
3. Have to load the bullets short (approximately 2.255").
4. Very long. 1" longer than PRI and C-Products 25 magazines.

2. C-Products: (2008 and newer.).
A. Positives:
1. Cheap. ($12).
2. New 25 rounders are very reliable.
3. 5, 10, 17, and 25 round magazines available.
4. See #1.

B. Negatives:
1. Can't load the bullets out as long as the PRI. (approximately 2.285").
2. 17 Round Straight mags are not that reliable.

3. NEW PRI (Waffle Pattern):
A. Positives:
1. Can load them out to 2.305"
2. 5, 10, 15, and 25 round magazines available.
3. Fit better in the magazine well.

B. Negatives:
1. Reliability is hit or miss.
2. Expensive. ($30-40).

4. OLDER PRI:
A. Positives:
1. Reliable.
2. Can load them out to 2.305"
3. 5, 10, 15, and 25 round magazines available.

B. Negatives:
1. Expensive. ($30-40).
2. Issues with the followers being too short (Not actually PRI's fault as the followers are made by Magpul.).
3. Fit very tight in the magazine well.

CONCLUSION:
For most uses, the C-Products 25 Round Magazines are the best bang for the buck. The only negative about the C-Products Magazines is the springs are a little weak. I highly recommend replacing them with the ISMI or Superior Shooting 556 30 round magazine springs, which will last forever. For Precision Shooting, the PRI Magazines are a better choice because they allow a COAL of 2.305".

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 Post subject: Gel Test Photos.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:54 pm 
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Hornady 6.8MM SPC 110 BTHP TAP:
Image
Gelatin Results:
Bare Gelatin: 110 gr TAP 2540 fps 16" bbl. (side)
Total Pen. 16.75", Max. Cav. 6.5"
Depth to Max. Cav. 5.75", Entry .5"
Retained weight: 73 gr.

Hornady 6.8 SPC 110 TAP URBAN® (V-Max):
Image
Gelatin Results:
Bare Gelatin: 110 gr TAP 2443 fps 16" bbl. (side)
Total Pen. 15", Max. Cav. 6.50"
Depth to Max. Cav. 5.25", Entry .5"
Retained weight: 69 gr.

SSA Barnes 85 Gr. TSX:
Image
Gelatin Results:
Total Penetration: 17.5"/16.5"

Barnes 110 Gr. TSX:
Image
Gelatin Results:
Total Penetration: 22"

Sierra 110 Gr. Pro-Hunters:
Image
Gelatin Results:
Firearm : Gas-operated semi-automatic with 20.0" barrel length and 1/10" twist
Cartridge : Handloaded 110gr Sierra Pro-Hunter soft-point
Block calibration : All depths corrected (actual BB penetration was 13.0cm at 595 ft/sec)
Single shot fired at 15 yards distance, impacted the block at 2466 ft/sec and penetrated to 12.5". Average recovered diameter was 0.551" and recovered weight was 77.0gr.

Sierra 115 Gr. SMK:
Image
Gelatin Results:
Total Penetration: 14"

Nosler 110 Gr. Accubond:
Image
Gelatin Results:
Muzzle Vel: 2589 FPS.
Distance: 100 yard.
Weight retention: 86.3 grains.
Bullet expansion: .525 dia.

Remington 115 gr FMJ:
Image
Gelatin Results:
vel=2436 fps from a 16" 1/11
BG: pen=15"+
NL=7cm
Max TC diam=14cm@18cm from 7-32cm
RD=0.40x0.15” (bullet flattened)
RL=1.09”
RW=96.3gr

Speer 90 gr TNT JHP:
Image
Gelatin Results:
vel=2610 fps from a 16" 1/11
BG: 13.8"+
NL=4.5cm
Max TC=13cm@13.5cm from 4.5-24cm
RD=NR
RL=NR
RW=NR

From DocGKR posted on M4Carbine.net:

6.8 mm Hornady 110 gr OTM, vel=2613 fps from a 16” 1/11
BG: pen=17.7”, NL=3.5cm, Max TC diam=11.5cm@11.5cm from 3.5-20cm, RD=0.50”, RL=0.37", RW=80.0gr
Glass: pen=14.0", NL=0.5cm, Max TC diam=13cm@14cm from 0.5-24cm, RD=0.32", RL=0.51", RW=74.5gr

6.8 mm SSA 115 gr OTM (SMK), vel= 2520 fps from a 16" 1/11
BG: pen=15.0”, NL=5cm, MAX TC diam=11.5cm@15cm from 5-28cm, RD=0.49”, RL=0.26", RW=53.5gr
Glass: pen=12.8", NL=0.5cm, Max TC diam=9.5cm@11cm from 0.5-19cm; RD=0.48", RL=0.20", RW=32.7gr

While both the Hornady 110 gr OTM and SSA 115 gr SMK OTM offer acceptable terminal performance, the Hornady projectile is more consistent.

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 Post subject: 6.8 SPC Bullets
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:55 pm 
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Photo Courtesy of JerBear.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington 6.8 SPC Guide.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:59 pm 
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PLEASE DO NOT POST ON THIS THREAD. POST COMMENTS ON THE THREAD BELOW:

http://forum.lwrci.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=9102

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