GAS SYSTEM INFO

The M6 Series of Rifles and Carbines.

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GAS SYSTEM INFO

Postby Announcement » Wed May 07, 2008 9:38 pm

Gas Piston Operating System

The M6A3 utilizes the proprietary LWRC short stroke, gas piston operating system. This system is vastly different than any other system on the market. It utilizes a fixed piston (referred to as the “nozzle”), and a reciprocating cylinder (refered to this as the “piston cup”) that fits over the nozzle. This accomplishes many things that the user will immediately recognize when using the system. Since the piston system is very lightweight, there are no adverse effects on barrel harmonics. Therefore the tester will find the LWRC M6A3 to be more accurate than most short stroke piston operated systems. Since the ribbed nozzle scrapes the inside of the piston cup with each round fired and blows the scraped carbon out of the system with the subsequent shot, the tester will note there is very little to clean concerning the piston system. Cleaning the operating system approximately every 2500 rounds is all that is required. Since there is no heat or carbon residue being introduced to the action of the carbine, the action is very easy to clean and maintain. The practice of scrubbing and scraping carbon off the bolt carrier group components and inside the receiver are over.

The gas system also integrates a “staged vent” of gasses used to operate the system. That means the system does not vent supersonic gasses in one violent dump. Instead it vents progressively more sub-sonic gasses as the piston cup moves to the rear with a final dump of low-pressure gas. This was done to smooth the transmission of the kinetic energy applied by the piston system of the action of the rifle to prevent the likelihood of the extractor tearing through the rim on the cartridge. The Marine will note the practical effect of this is a very soft recoil impulse and near elimination of muzzle rise thus allowing very fast follow up shots. The user will also notice he can place his hand directly over the gas system with no risk of burn or injury; just a puff of warm gas. The user will note that the system registers greater sound reduction with a suppressor than other piston operated rifles and has proven quieter than a standard M4 when tested suppressed in the semi-auto mode.



LWRC uses a bolt carrier key that functions as the anvil for the operating rod to impact on. This key is dovetailed into the bolt carrier for optimum strength. There are 5 reasons for this design:

1. The key like other components of the gas system is made out of a very strong, impact resistant alloy typically used in aerospace programs or landing gear components and heavy load gears and cogs for the same reasons LWRC selected it. The material is called XXXXXX steel (from XXXXXXXXX). XXXXXXX steels are iron alloys which are known for possessing superior strength without losing malleability in pre-heat treat processing. The iron base is alloyed principally with a large percentage of nickel to produce a very specific heat-treatment product. XXXXXXXX steel is essentially free of carbon, which distinguishes it from most other types of steel. The result is a steel which:

* Possesses high strength and toughness
* Allows for easy machining with minimal distortion
* Has uniform, predictable shrinkage during heat treatment
* Can be easily nitrocarburized
* Resists corrosion and crack propagation

2. The dovetail interface with the bolt carrier transmits the force over a larger area on the carrier and makes the entire assembly far stronger. Another reason for the key is that it is replaceable.

3. It allows for a shorter operating rod. The longer the operating rod, the more potential for it to bend, and the more difficult it is to manufacture straight, especially during heat treating.

4. There is a very slight downward slope on the key. In piston operated rifles, the action is being pushed off axis, not in a straight line like a direct gas impingement rifle, therefore it wants to tilt and can result in wear on the receiver. With the downward slope on the key, the forces are re-vectored ensuring the carrier is pushed straight back in the receiver.

5. The end of the operating rod is fully supported by the receiver bushing where it enters the open space of the receiver. We designed this operating rod to be fully supported as it impacts the bolt carrier key (anvil). In other words, we found it counter to good design to have an inch of the operating rod hanging out inside the receiver un-supported. It is more likely to bend and disable the rifle. An example of this is the HK 416. The operating rod of the 416 is unsupported inside the receiver. To do this requires a much thicker operating rod for strength which HK has incorporated, but this also required they raise the height of the receiver to accommodate it. This results in a system that has a nonstandard picatinny height over bore axis requiring special mounts to keep the height of the optics on the same height over bore axis as the M4.

The attributes of the LWRC piston system are unique, novel and result in overall function and longevity of the rifle and are Patent Pending. To give an example of longevity, LWRC usually re-barrels a carbine 4 times utilizing the same piston components in demonstration rifles before we retire the components, and they are retired for good measure only.

The LWRCI gas system was designed so that it cannot be assembled incorrectly.

Since the LWRC system is self-regulating for various gas pressures and volumes, the gas port erosion problem encountered by the M4A1 is no longer an issue in the M6A3. The M6A3 IAR does have a manual gas regulation system, but this is simply to optimize the cyclic rate of fire when the rifle is being fired when fitted with a sound suppressor. The rifle will work without issue even if the user does not adjust the gas when using a suppressor. The system only uses the gas required to cycle the action, no more, no less.

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Postby nbeery82 » Wed May 07, 2008 11:38 pm

other AR manufacturers are gonna be jealous when they read this.
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Re: GAS SYSTEM INFO

Postby Taiter24 » Thu May 08, 2008 12:08 am

Since the LWRC system is self-regulating for various gas pressures and volumes, the gas port erosion problem encountered by the M4A1 is no longer an issue in the M6A3.


Just to confirm that M4A1 is not a typo that should read M6A1?

+1 nbeery82

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Postby E98T » Thu May 08, 2008 2:58 am

No he means a gas impingement M4A1. All of the LWRC's M6, M6A1, M6A2 have the same system as the M6A3. Darren is only referring to the M6A3 as it is their newest model. My M6A1 SOC and M6A2 SRT both share these same features already. :D
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Postby borebrush » Thu May 08, 2008 7:48 am

Not exactly. The A3 is midlength so it has a longer intermediate rod, and completely different gas block assembly and front sight.
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Newb

Postby Taiter24 » Thu May 08, 2008 2:56 pm

As stated before I'm a new guy to the piston system (and LWRC) and I've been reading sometimes more than once all the info in here. At first glance I thought it may have been a typo and that there was a problem with the M6A1 that was corrected in the M6A3. I think it was pretty late when I was going through this thread the first time.

Thanks for the help guys.

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Postby E98T » Fri May 09, 2008 8:25 pm

borebrush wrote:Not exactly. The A3 is midlength so it has a longer intermediate rod, and completely different gas block assembly and front sight.


I agree there are a few differences; but the basic gas piston system is the same.
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Postby fmboss429 » Thu Jun 05, 2008 1:11 pm

I can't wait to get one!!!! Any clue how close you are to filling all of the backorders? I know an overly asked question, But i want to wait until your done to place my order. No need in clogging your office with more backorder paperwork...
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high capacity magazines?

Postby englishcharliebrown » Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:02 pm

i would like to know if any manufactures make a 100 magazine for any of these lwrc assault rifles? i saw it in the lwrc video on youtube, it was a doughnut clip; not sure how many rounds though.
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Hey borebrush! is there a difference in recoil between these

Postby englishcharliebrown » Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:05 pm

my main selling point is that on the videos i've seen, the lwrc seemed almost recoiless. also this gas system is not noticable looking at the company pictures. do they hide the gas system under a sleeve?
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the reason im asking is.

Postby englishcharliebrown » Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:21 pm

i wanted to make sure the lwrc i get has the gas system for reduced recoil.
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Postby Pokeguyjai » Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:44 pm

You can reduce recoil by getting a stronger buffer tube spring. There is still going to be recoil on any gun chambered larger than a .22LR.

And its not illegal to put all three points in one post...
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Postby Omajack » Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:51 pm

Question on the gas piston system. Bye looking at the video of this system how does it effect night sites and scopes does any of the carbon blow back on the optics. P.S. how does it effect IR scopes.
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Postby Dreaded Snowmen » Wed Sep 03, 2008 1:34 am

I have a XS tritium front sight, and noted that if you have a flip up type front sight, you may have problems with carbon buildup on the sight when it is folded down (depending on where you mount you front sight). If you have a fixed front sight, the only thing you will notice is some carbon on the sight tower. I have not had any problems with carbon build up on my optics either. The vented gasses will leave carbon on the rails, rail covers, and accessories you have mounted within about 2" of the piston nozzle, so I usually leave that area clear. Clean up is minor and easily done so other than positioning your fold down night sight this is not an issue. No experience with IR or NODs. 8)
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Postby Whaledriver » Thu Oct 16, 2008 5:14 am

Dreaded Snowmen wrote:I have a XS tritium front sight, and noted that if you have a flip up type front sight, you may have problems with carbon buildup on the sight when it is folded down (depending on where you mount you front sight). If you have a fixed front sight, the only thing you will notice is some carbon on the sight tower. I have not had any problems with carbon build up on my optics either. The vented gasses will leave carbon on the rails, rail covers, and accessories you have mounted within about 2" of the piston nozzle, so I usually leave that area clear. Clean up is minor and easily done so other than positioning your fold down night sight this is not an issue. No experience with IR or NODs. 8)


Does the M6A3 have a thermal foot-print visible to other muzzle-side IR sights? In other words, when the rifle fires and gases are vented, is this venting visible to anyone with a night sight or IR thermal sight?
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